Monday, October 18, 2010

Doggone Safe Members Recognized for Achievements by the International Positive Dog Training Association

Doggone Safe members were recognized with a total of 9 awards and 20 nominations from the International Positive Dog Training Association for 2010 in various categories including, dog training excellence, education and humane dog training. These awards are based on peer voting and Doggone Safe is very proud of all its members and their accomplishments and dedication to the promotion of positive dog training.

Joan and Teresa, Doggone Safe cofounders


Doggone Safe is a non-profit organization incorporated in the US and Canada and is dedicated to dog bite prevention education and victim support. The coroner’s jury inquest into Courtney Trempe’s death by a dog attack made numerous recommendations regarding public education, few of which have been implemented. Doggone Safe was formed with the mandate to facilitate implementation of the education based recommendations of the Trempe inquest jury.

Doggone Safe promotes positive training and specifically clicker training as a safe way to train dogs, especially for children, to facilitate the development of a respectful and loving bond between the dog and family members. This all positive method uses the science of operant conditioning to teach dogs without force, punishment or correction. “Clicker training is hands down the best way to train a dog” said Teresa Lewin, animal behavior specialist and Vice President, Education and Development for Doggone Safe. “If everyone would train their dogs with clicker training from the day they bring them home as young puppies, we would see a lot fewer behaviour problems and aggression as they grow into adults”.

The International Positive Dog Training Association was founded by Norma Jeanne Laurette and Sherry Herla. The International Positive Dog Training Association is for dog-related professionals dog owners and enthusiasts who are willing to take a stand for the use of only humane techniques in dog training and behaviour modification. The purpose of the IPDTA is to dissect every tool and technique to agree on proper application and to establish the accepted standards for what is humane and what is abusive.

To recognize and encourage trainers who choose to use positive methods rather than force and fear to train dogs, the International Positive Dog Training Association sponsors an annual awards program. Nominations and voting is done by peers and Doggone Safe is very proud to announce that the following members were nominated and recognized for their accomplishments:

Name
Nomination

Brenda Lowry
Innovation Award            


Fear Rehabilitation Award


Training Excellence


Human Touch Award


Outstanding Mentor Award


Behaviour Therapy Excellence


Aggression Rehabilitation

David Thorpe
Peers choice award

Kelly Helliwell
Best new business award


Human Touch Award


Training Excellence

Joan Orr and Teresa Lewin
Education Award


Courage of Conviction Award


Outstanding Mentor Award


Outstanding Achievement Award

Judi Dowson
Training Excellence

Lynda O’Neill
Training Excellence

Teresa Lewin
Peers Choice Award

Wendy Gould
Personal Sacrifices Award

Yamei Ross
Human touch award




The following members were winners of IPDTA 2010 awards:


Name
Award

Brenda Lowry
Outstanding mentor award            


Fear Rehab Award


Training Excellence

David Thorpe
Peers choice award

Kelly Helliwell
Best new business award


Joan Orr and Teresa Lewin
Education Award
Outstanding Mentor award


Judi Dowson
Training Excellence


Teresa Lewin
Peers Choice Award








Doggone Safe president Joan Orr said “we are very pleased to see so many of our members honoured this way by their peers and we are delighted that highly qualified and dedicated professionals such as these choose to join and promote Doggone Safe”.

Halloween Safety Tips for Kids


Changes in routine and the strange sights and sounds of Halloween can cause stress in a normally placid family dog. Keep dogs out of the fray by securing them away from the door and providing a long-lasting chew treat. Teach kids to Be a Tree and stand still if any dogs come near them on Halloween.

Halloween is lots of fun for kids, but many dogs will be confused or upset by kids in strange costumes and by lots of people coming to the door, but never being invited in. Doggone Safe offers the following tips for dog owners, kids and parents:

Dog owners:
  1. Secure your dog behind a closed door or in a crate in a room away from the front door or the party if children are meeting at your house.
  2. Give him a juicy bone from the butcher, a sterilized bone or Kong stuffed with hotdog, Rollover or other soft dog treats or a pre-stuffed bone from the pet store.
  3. Play music or leave a TV or radio playing in the dog’s room to help mask the sounds of the activity at the front door.
  4. Close drapes so that the dog does not see people coming and going through the window.
  5. If you have a dog that barks at the sound of the doorbell, disconnect it or watch for trick-or-treaters so that they do not have to ring or knock.
  6. Puppies and dogs that like to chase can get overly excited by costumes with dangly bits or streaming material. Supervise very carefully if you have a dog that may try to play with your children’s costumes while they are wearing them. Teach kids to Be a Tree and stand still if the dog does start nipping at their costume since the more they move, the more exited the dog will get.
  7. Keep your dogs (and cats) indoors around Halloween time. Pets have been stolen, injured or poisoned as part of Halloween pranks or other rituals.
Kids and Parents:

  1. Avoid houses if you can hear a dog barking behind the door, you can see a dog behind a screen door or you see a dog tied up in the yard or barking behind a fence.
  2. Never approach any dog, even if you know him. He may not recognize you in your costume.
  3. If an owner opens the door and there is a dog there, just stay still and wait for the dog owner to put the dog away. You can tell them you do not want to come near the dog. Do not move toward the person and dog. Wait for them to come to you to give you your candy. Wait for them to close the door before you turn and leave.
  4. If a dog escapes just stand still and Be a Tree (hands folded in front, watching your feet). He will just sniff you and then move on. Wait for the owner to come and get the dog before you turn away.
  5. If you meet a loose dog, Be a Tree and wait until it goes away.
  6. It is best to ignore other people’s dogs on Halloween if you meet them out walking. The dog may be worried about all the strange creatures that are out and about. Even if you know the dog, he may not recognize you in your costume.

Doggone Safe wishes everyone a safe and happy Halloween!